Holistic Survival
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#7 – Practical Self-Defense Skills Needed For Modern Survival

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Announcer:

Welcome to the Holistic Survival Show with Jason Hartman. The economic storm brewing around the world is set to spill into all aspects of our lives. Are you prepared? Where are you going to turn for the critical life skills necessary to survive and prosper?

The Holistic Survival Show is your family’s insurance for a better life. Jason will teach you to think independently, to understand threats, and how to create the ultimate action plan. Sudden change, or worst case scenario, you’ll be ready. Welcome to Holistic Survival, your key resource for protecting the people, places, and profits you care about in uncertain times.

Ladies and gentlemen, your host, Jason Hartman.

Jason Hartman:

Welcome to the Holistic Survival Show No. 7. This is your host, Jason Hartman. Glad you could join me today and I hope you’ve been enjoying the show. It is a relatively new show, where we talk about protecting the people, places, and profits that matter to you in uncertain times. And if you are interested in the profit part of that equation, the last “P”, I highly recommend that if you’re not a listener now, that you listen to my Creating Wealth Show. We just published Show No. 118 and we have a wealth of information, well over 100 hours of content there that I think you’ll really, really like. So that’s the Creating Wealth Show and it’s all available to you by searching Jason Hartman in the iTunes Store or go to www.jasonhartman.com and you can listen there.

All right, today, the Holistic Survival Show, we are going to talk about street self-defense and you can listen in to my interview with martial arts expert, Michael Pace, and we are going to talk about defending yourself. We’re going to talk about brute force. We’re going to talk about physicality and hopefully, you will never need any of the stuff we talk about today, but just in case, it never hurts to be prepared. So let’s go to the interview with Michael Pace.

Interview with Michael Pace

Jason Hartman:

It’s my pleasure to welcome Mike Pace to the show. Mike is a self-defense and martial arts expert and he’s put together his own system that takes into account many different martial arts. And I think you’ll find this interview fascinating for that all too important and all too practical art of self-defense. Mike, welcome.

Mike Pace:

Thank you. Thanks for having me today, Jason.

Jason Hartman:

It’s great to have you on. So tell us a little bit about self-defense. Of course, I think we know why it’s important, but kind of give us your take on it and let’s drill down into the subject.

Mike Pace:

Obviously, today is a little different than it was back just really a few years ago and today I think it’s important for everyone to have at least a rudimentary understanding of basic self-defense and be able to at least know what to do and how to react in a dangerous situation.

Jason Hartman:

Now, you’ve been teaching martial arts for 42 years, is that correct?

Mike Pace:

Yes, I have been studying and teaching since 1967, so it’s been a long time.

Jason Hartman:

Fantastic. What is the most important element in effective self-defense?

Mike Pace:

The most important element is dealing with the adrenal rush, which is a natural result of aggression.

Jason Hartman:

So you say the adrenal rush. Do you mean the fight or flight response then?

Mike Pace:

Yes, exactly. Under stress, under fear, which is a natural result, even for someone with training, your heart beat starts to accelerate rapidly and there is a major – we call it an adrenal dump. The adrenal glands really pour in a tremendous amount into the blood stream and it races the heart. It has a lot of effect that, unless you’ve experienced them, it catches people really off guard. For example, some of the effects of the adrenal rush are that you get tunnel vision, so your vision to the peripheral really is eliminated or minimized greatly. You also lose fine motor coordination. You get the shakes. You feel really shaky inside. You lose a good amount of cognitive thinking, so you don’t have necessarily the resources to dig deep within your mind to choose and pick what you’re going to do.

So with all these things happening simultaneously, a lot of people just freeze and virtually do nothing in a dangerous situation.

Jason Hartman:

That is really amazing. The system that was sort of set up to protect us actually becomes a liability in a threat situation?

Mike Pace:

It does. Yes, we get stronger and more powerful and you hear stories about people lifting someone out from under a car and different things. That’s all true. But at the same time, the effect of it can be very negative. Unfortunately, a great amount of the information that’s been given out and taught traditionally at many martial art schools, courses, and so on, does not take into account the adrenal rush. And over the years, we had an interesting – I’ll tell you an interesting story. A number of years ago, at the National Martial Arts Convention, they were doing a demonstration on adrenal stress training, and it was the first time that I had really seen it. It was about 10 years ago. The audience that I was in, just to put things into perspective, were several hundred martial arts instructors. There were school owners and instructors.

They get on stage and they bring out this guy dressed in what we call a bullet man suit, his body armor, and they ask for a couple of volunteers. And what they asked the volunteers to do was to basically attack this bullet man because the body armor protected him from full contact training. In essence, to go out and pull the trigger at the right time, when they felt that they couldn’t avoid the confrontation with verbal type defenses or spatial defenses, they needed to actually get into a physical confrontation.

It really was amazing because these were all trained black belts and this guy gets up on stage in this outfit and he starts screaming and yelling and cursing, using street language and all kinds of things. Those of us sitting in the seats could feel ourselves shaking inside just from being in that room and listening to the intensity of what was going on. I watched black belt after black belt go up there and almost look foolish trying to defend against this armored attacker.

Jason Hartman:

And it was just because of how this guy looked and what he was saying, his yelling and screaming, that sort of intimidated everybody? Is that what you’re saying?

Mike Pace:

Exactly, yeah. The odd part about it is that it does; it affects everybody whether you’re trained or aren’t trained. It’s just that if you expect that and you learn to accept it and to use that power, as opposed to letting it ruffle your feathers and cause you to react in ways that you’re not expecting, even someone with a lot of training can really fall apart. In my case, when I saw that and felt it just from sitting there, I said this is something I need to at least experience and see what it’s about. From that point on, we got involved with the creators of this particular system and I had them come to my school. We did a number of seminars and we got so heavily involved with it I actually became a part of that whole training scenario, and we now have the body armor and we do the seminars ourselves.

But the important part was the process that we learned and derived from this type of training because it caused us really to revamp and to change everything that we were teaching and had been teaching for a lot of years.

Jason Hartman:

It seems to me, Mike, that the way to overcome that adrenal rush problem is to create it in simulation a few times over and over so people kind of know how to deal with it. It’s sort of like pilots. They’ll simulate an emergency scenario and then when it really happens in real life – hopefully it never does – they’re kind of ready for it. I’ve done this before. They don’t freak out about it, right? Is that the thing to do?

Mike Pace:

Exactly. There are actually two elements to it. Yes and what you said is definitely a big part of it. The other part of it is being trained in techniques that actually have been tested under adrenal rush because unfortunately, much of what’s taught today requires either too many steps, where again, I mentioned the cognitive thinking, where we don’t have access to it. We actually go into sometimes what’s called a frog brain or reptilian brain where, under a lot of stress, we just don’t have access to our normal reasoning power. And when you also couple that with loss of fine motor coordination, and many times there’s a certain amount of auditory exclusion – you don’t hear much or don’t hear anything at all if the heart beat is up high enough – when you put these all together, a lot of the traditional training doesn’t work.

So training that is designed specifically and tested under adrenal rush situations is going to work best.

Jason Hartman:

So how do you create the adrenal rush in simulation then because you’re not really scared in simulation probably?

Mike Pace:

Well, you know something? It doesn’t sound like you would be, but if somebody gets in your face and starts yelling, screaming, cursing, threatening, it’s amazing what happens to you. Even though you know that the situation is – you’re in a controlled environment, but even though you know that, it still has the effect on you of raising the heart beat and getting the adrenal rush going.

Now it’s possible and most likely it’s not at the same intensity it would be if it were a real situation, but it’s definitely high enough that the participants in a program like this can definitely feel it beyond a doubt. Many of them even many times recall situations, bad situations in their life, and break down. We’ve seen people break down and cry and everything when this happens. So it’s very intense.

Jason Hartman:

It’s kind of like in the army. They do boot camp and the drill sergeant is screaming at you and yelling at you and maybe that’s sort of that type of simulation almost.

Mike Pace:

It could very well be. I was in the service years back and they definitely do that. But when it’s directed at you and it’s right in your face, you feel it. I’ve demonstrated this to people over and over again, just saying I’m not going to touch you, but I want you to feel what it feels like, and I get in their face, threatening and yelling and screaming. Right away, their heart starts to race and their insides start to squirm and it just happens.

Of course, we’re trained specifically on how to elicit this adrenal rush and when you couple that together with the body armor, it’s a very empowering type of situation and a great learning experience.

The other thing that tends to happen from it is what you learn and what you experience under your high adrenal situation tends to be remembered again when that reoccurs. I’ll just give you some examples. One of the things that we do when we do this type of training is we have a coach, so the coach is kind of with the student who’s participating and kind of behind them and kind of telling them, okay, put your hands up and tell this person to back off, helping them practice some of the spatial things and get ready and get prepared. And then when the attack actually comes, they’re actually getting yell-outs and callouts of what they want them to do, whether it be a palm-heel strike or a knee strike, something to that effect.

But the amazing thing is that a lot of people have taken this type of training over the years. Just from the law of averages, a number of these people have been attacked on the street years down the road. But over and over again, people come back and say, “You know, I had flashbacks to the day we did the training.” Some of them actually say, “I could actually hear the coach with me telling me what to do,” and sometimes that training was years prior.

So again, it’s very empowering and it does reach a part of our brain that we don’t normally use on a daily basis, but it’s still entrenched there and it still develops there. And we’ve also found that the more time that type of training is repeated, like you mentioned before, the more solidly it’s locked in.

Jason Hartman:

Okay, good point. So we’re going to get into specifics as to real how-to’s during this interview of what people can really do to defend themselves. But I want to sort of set that up, Mike. Over the years, I’ve taken Judo, Aikido, Karate. What is the best marital art, if there is one? The thing I like about your system is it pulls from many and it’s sort of an eclectic approach, but can you pick a best one or is that not possible?

Mike Pace:

In my opinion, most of the traditional, the way they’re taught traditionally, are not in themselves the best way to defend yourself. But let me simplify it a little bit. The throwing arts, the grappling arts, the arts that require manipulation of wrists and joints and things like that, are probably the most difficult to pull off under an adrenal rush. Think about it. Most of those require a number of different movements, No. 1, again, so you’re now starting to get into the area of your minimized cognitive thinking. And secondly, and very importantly, is that you’re talking about fine motor coordination, which just goes away. You just lose that under this adrenal rush. A lot of the Aikido type movements, where you’re locking the wrist and the fingers and the joints, a lot of that you just can’t access.

And the other thing that tends to happen – and this is an aside from the adrenal rush – but a lot of those types of arts, there are a lot of variables. As an example, you go to throw somebody with a Judo throw, you could be throwing somebody who, for example, is 6’3” and 160 pounds, or you also may be against somebody who is 5’2” and 250 pounds. It’s a whole different situation. It’s one thing if you’re throwing somebody approximately your own weight and height, but when you start working on somebody who is extremely tall or extremely short and heavy, it’s a whole different ballgame. So there are a lot of variables that come into play.

When you deal with joint manipulation, everybody reacts differently to that. Some people, with the slightest movement of their wrist, they’re on the ground. Other people, because of the flexibility that they have, their tendons are very stretched, they don’t feel anything. So you’re dealing with a lot of variables and in my mind, what self-defense needs to be is to give you the very best chance, to stack the odds in your favor.

And to summarize, I believe that the striking arts are the most effective for the average person to protect himself.

Jason Hartman:

So what are the striking arts then?

Mike Pace:

Well, these would be, for example, like Karate or Tai Kwon Do, although Tai Kwon Do is mostly kicking. And that’s another thing, as far as kicking is concerned, kicking is really overrated in real fights. It’s not used nearly as much as you would think and that’s mainly because real attacks and real self-defense situations rarely end up in a sparring kind of situation, where two people are standing there moving around. Usually, it’s a rush, it’s quick, and the whole thing is over in 20 – 30 seconds. So there’s a lot of hands, elbows, knees, head. These are the kinds of things that work and a lot of the long range stuff never even gets the chance to happen in a real fight.

Jason Hartman:

So what is that list of the striking arts then?

Mike Pace:

Well, a lot of the Chinese Kung Fu arts use a lot of hand techniques. Wing Chun is one example. Jeet Kune Do, which was popularized and actually created by Bruce Lee, is also a good art for that kind of thing. Certain Karate and Kempo arts use a lot of hand techniques. The elements of those I think work, but the real key is simplicity because remember, on an adrenal rush, you’re not going to be able to seek with more than a couple things at once.

Jason Hartman:

Right, because your mind will be very limited.

Mike Pace:

And things that require multiple moves and tricky body positions and different things, it’s been our experience with this over the years, they just don’t work. You just can’t get them to work.

Jason Hartman:

Yeah, that’s what I like about your approach. It’s very practical, so it’s street stuff. Your website is www.StreetSelfDefense.com. It lives up to its name. Talk to us about male on female type situations. What are the differences for women defending themselves versus men?

Mike Pace:

Let’s face it. Women are at a major disadvantage because they just don’t have the strength, especially the upper body strength, that men have. In the first place, one of the very, very best things a woman can learn is to use what we call verbal and spatial techniques because over and over again, most attacks don’t start with someone jumping out from the bushes or hiding behind a door, although some do. Most of the time, there is what the criminals like to call the interview. They want to size up the person that they’re going after. They want to find out how much resistance there’s going to be, if the person is going to be easy prey, what they call “free lunch”, or if it’s going to be a difficult situation.

Jason Hartman:

I love how you call that the “interview.”

Mike Pace:

Well, that’s really what happens. It could be threatening. It could be a series of questions. Women should rely – the very, very first thing that they should rely on is their gut feeling. Women are more in tune to that typically than men.

Jason Hartman:

Intuition.

Mike Pace:

Yeah, intuition than men are. And if it doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t right. A lot of situations could be avoided right from the get go if they follow that gut feeling, follow that intuition. If it doesn’t feel right, it may not be right, so don’t take the chance. Don’t test it out. Don’t go that way. Many times, you’ve read stories about women, who just to try to be polite and try not to make noise or to put themselves where they feel uncomfortable, will allow certain liberties perhaps with someone. And then the next step is a rape or an attack or something to that effect.

So using a gut feeling, learning what we call the verbal defenses and spatial defenses, where the hands come up in what we call an assertive position, and basically, that’s just standing with one leg slightly in front of the other. Not in a fighting position, but both hands up and open and facing the person. So it’s kind of like, “NO! Back off!” That’s the body language we want. And body language is very, very powerful. There are different studies on this, but body language in communication is really more important than what’s said.

What we do is we try to teach our students, both male and female, but particularly the females, to be congruent in their body language, their tone of voice, their eye contact, and again, criminals that have been interviewed from prison that were somewhat reformed, but in prison and talked about attacks and different things that they’ve done, whether it be to rob or to rape or whatever, they say it over and over again. We don’t want to go back to jail. We don’t want to be arrested. We want it to be easy. We want to pick the right victim so it’s easy. So the best advice you can give a woman is don’t make yourself an easy target, and many times, just getting those hands up and a loud strong voice and good verbal commands to back off and get away, they realize that it’s not going to – this may not be an easy thing. Many times, that’s enough. It’s not always.

But what it does as well is it puts the person that’s on the defensive it gets their adrenal system going. It gets them ready for, again, as you said, for fight or flight. It might be fight. But obviously, a woman has a big disadvantage in strength, especially upper body strength, so she needs to choose good targets, like the eyes and the throat, perhaps the nose, the groin, those kinds of things, where a good strike there can at least slow somebody up and maybe just give them enough time to get away.

Jason Hartman:

What do you think about people carrying pepper spray, mace, things like that?

Mike Pace:

Well, that’s an interesting question because these things are great. The problem with most of these is that you just don’t have them ready and available. Women will sometimes carry a pepper spray in their pocketbook or somewhere in their car, but you think about being under an adrenal rush where you have no fine motor coordination, and getting this thing out, getting it open, getting the valve set up, and being able to use it, most of the time, there’s no time to do that. And it’s the same thing even with some of the things you attach to the keychain and some of these different self-defense weapons that are sold, if they’re ready and available and the woman is prepared, yes, they’re great. But unfortunately, most people never get a chance to use them because everything happens so quickly. And again, they’re fumbling around and this big adrenal rush is going. So conceptually, it’s a great idea, but in practical application, it’s not. They don’t work all that well.

Jason Hartman:

So the thing you always have with you is yourself.

Mike Pace:

You do, but the other thing that we teach – in fact, we actually have an entire DVD on this. It’s called Extraordinary Impact. What we teach is being able to take every day, anything in your hand, anything that you can get a hold of as a weapon in self-defense. One of the problems with the readymade weapons, so to speak, is they look like a weapon. If somebody is holding a pepper spray in front of you, you know what it is. You know it’s some sort of a pepper spray made type of device. If somebody has a sharp bladed knife or a little club or anything in their hand like that, especially if they’re holding it like a club, it’s very, very obvious what it is. And one of the important things of self-defense is surprise. It’s a great element. If you’ve got the element of surprise on your side, it can really help.

So basically, what we teach, just as an example, let’s say that they have a cell phone in their hand or a set of keys or a pen or a comb or a brush or a cup, or almost anything that you could think of, we teach them how to use them as a devastating weapon in self-defense. But it comes from a place that the way it’s held and the way it’s positioned, so it doesn’t look like it’s even a weapon, and before you know it, it’s in somebody’s eyes or throat. And again, it gives someone enough time to escape.

Jason Hartman:

What is your opinion of some of the other self-defense weapons that you see advertised? Is it pretty much just know how to use your body and know how to use anything around you as a weapon? I mean what you just said or are there some things that are worth having or it’s just a matter of what you were mentioning before, you’re just not going to have it ready when you need it? The likelihood is Murphy’s Law, right?

Mike Pace:

The exception to that, Jason, is that if you know that you’re going to be traveling on a consistent basis in an area that may not be the safest area – let me just give you an example. Let’s say that someone worked in an office building and at times, they know that they’re going to be working late at night and they know that every day they’ve got to go into a parking garage or walk into a dark parking lot every single night.

Jason Hartman:

Then they have it ready before they go.

Mike Pace:

They have it ready, right. Before they leave the building, it’s in their hand and it’s ready. Then it’s useful and effective. But just to have it and carry it and to think you’re going to be able to have it ready to use, by the time you even try to do it, it’s too late.

Jason Hartman:

Tell us a little bit about some moves. Give us some ideas. You alluded to that earlier. You talked about the sort of vulnerable spots. I know the human body has a lot of different weak spots and deadly sort of spots. Tell us about some moves and examples of that.

Mike Pace:

One of the things that we teach when you’re at a little bit of a distance is a groin kick, and we teach it a little bit different than a traditional martial arts kick. This kick would be done – if you could picture the legs as being a V or a guiding point to guide the kick up and under into the groin, as opposed to try to pinpoint the groin with a kick. Again, your accuracy is way off typically under adrenal rush, but using the legs themselves to guide the kick up and into the groin from the bottom, so you’re actually kicking with the top part of the foot or the shin, depending on the distance from them.

If they were a little closer, then it would be the knee. It would be the knee up into the groin and that is a really effective tool and something that should definitely be used in close range.

We also are a big advocate of using elbow strikes. Elbows are very, very powerful, a lot more powerful than a fist. It’s a big bone and it’s hard. It’s very, very powerful. I think anybody can relate to that. If they have kids or they’ve watched them, just anything with kids, almost invariably, at some point and time, they get hit with an elbow from a 2-year-old in the face and it hurts and it makes you move and back away. Can you imagine even a 110 pound woman winding up and throwing a strong elbow at somebody’s face or eye or jaw or neck? It could be very effective.

Another thing that we recommend teaching is a palm-heel strike. A palm-heel strike is using the heel or the lower section of the palm with the fingers pointing up, and that strike can be directed either at the jaw, the nose, or even the forehead could be in that area.

People talk about eye strikes. An eye strike could be really awesome. You can totally stop an attacker with a good eye strike. The problem is again, you’re dealing with the accuracy. Even a slight movement of their head and you miss the eye strike and your fingers hit the forehead or the cheek and it’s not going to do anything really. It doesn’t stop them at all.

But I teach something called a palm-eye, which you’re actually throwing a palm strike, but with tilting the hand forward with the fingers open. So what we’re trying to do is we’d like to get the eye strike in, but if the eye strike doesn’t hit, the palm still hits the target. So it’s kind of a combination strike and it’s really effective because it doesn’t have to be accurate and if any one of the fingers even catches the eye, it could end the whole thing right there very quickly.

We also teach something we call a shark attack. You could have some technical names, but basically, it’s using both palms. Let’s just say for example, someone came up and tried to choke or grabbed you from the front in some way. Taking both palms with the hands up high and striking straight downward and inward simultaneously, and if you can lean into it a little bit, and knock that head back, what it does is it actually rocks the brain in the cranial cavity. Although it may not knock the person out, and many times it does, it shocks them for a couple of sections, sort of puts them a little, if you will, on queer street for a second, too, and it gives you either an opportunity to escape or to follow up with some elbows or knee kicks, or perhaps even head butts, where you’re using the top part of your head at the hairline into the nose area, which is another effective strike.

Jason Hartman:

You know what’s interesting about the choking move, Mike, is that whenever you see a movie, it’s always this same sort of thing. The attacker grabs someone’s neck, starts choking them, and then what they do is they go grab their hands to get them off their neck, when really that’s not what they should do, right? They should be doing an offensive move that will knock them in the nose or in the head or the groin or whatever, right?

Mike Pace:

You’re 100 percent right. It is a natural body reaction to reach for the person’s hands when someone’s choking you. That’s why you definitely need the training to realize that you need to be aggressive and to attack. Obviously, if you place your fingers on their face with the thumbs alongside the nose and drove the thumbs straight back into the eyes, that’s probably going to get them to release pretty quick from a chokehold.

Jason Hartman:

Yeah, especially if you have some fingernails there.

Mike Pace:

Yeah, but even without them, it doesn’t take much. Just the slightest pressure on the eyes and it’s really painful. And our natural reaction to that is – see, certain strikes cause a natural body reaction, and so if you strike somebody in the eye, it is a reflex action to pull back and to put their hands up to their face and eyes.

Jason Hartman:

Right. Now, I want to ask you, though, about this choking because I think that’s sort of an important one. The other problem there that women might face is they may have a shorter reach than the attacker, right? So the attacker could be choking them, but they can’t reach the attackers head or eyes to do an offensive move.

Mike Pace:

That is correct.

Jason Hartman:

What do they do then? They should look at leg?

Mike Pace:

We do teach what we call a stripping technique where you actually reach both hands, where your fingers are actually touching the palms around the thumb area of their attacker on both hands, until you’re reaching up with both hands. But to make it work – I mean that’s not going to work in itself because you’re working to a certain extent strength against strength. A woman, again, typically isn’t going to be as strong as a man and that isn’t going to work. But what we teach is to simultaneously bring up a sweeping kick, so either the knee or the shin hits the groin as you go to strip. So then it takes the focus off of the choke and onto the pain of the attack.

But most of the time, when you see a real choke being done, most of the time, the elbows are bent. Their arms aren’t really straight out where the person can’t reach. In almost every case, you can reach the face or eyes.

But you’re right. If they couldn’t, a groin strike is going to bring the head forward. Again, that’s a body reflex. If you hit somebody in the groin, their head’s coming down. It’s just how it is. It’s reflective. It’s not even something that you think about or that happens to most people. It happens to just about everybody just about every time. And those are the kinds of odds you’re looking for. You want to put yourself in the best position, give yourself the best odds to escape an attack. You want to rely on things that are almost sure to happen every time and that would be one.

Jason Hartman:

Okay, good point. One more thing on the neck. You always see this sort of thing and it’s common in movies, but could happen in real life, certainly. Someone comes up behind you and starts choking you. What do you do about that, especially a woman, who is smaller, the man is probably taller than she is, and that’s a tough one, isn’t it?

Mike Pace:

Yeah, it is, but the very, very best – and again, one of the things that you want to try to do when you’re attacked is to break the focus, so again, if someone is grabbing you and choking from behind, their focus is on their hands and choking that throat. So with a slight twist of the body, a slap to the groin can be very effective. Men know that it doesn’t take an awful lot to get the focus off of whatever they’re doing onto that pain of the groin strike.

We teach a quick strike to the groin and there’s actually a number of different ways that you can actually release the hold. And one of them is the stripping technique that we talked about from the front. Another one is where you twist your body to the side as you strike the groin and reach up between their arms, shoot your arm between there, and shoot it straight forward toward the front. And that uses actually your shoulder and back to break the hold on one side. And you really can’t choke if you don’t have pressure on both sides. You need pressure on both sides to affect the choke. And then, of course, we follow up with elbow strikes and palms and knees and so on from there.

I’m trying to give you a visual effect on that, Jason. That’s probably the best that I can do without seeing it.

Jason Hartman:

Sure, I know. We’re not watching one of your DVDs right now, but we’re doing the best we can on audio.

Mike Pace:

And you know something? Another technique that can really work, believe it or not, is as simple as just lifting the foot up and stomping down with everything you got with your heel on their instep. The bones of the instep are fairly small. Those metatarsal bones are pretty small and they’re arched. A good strong hard stomp, many times, those bones can be broken. If not, at least it’s very painful. So again, it’s a distraction if nothing else and enables you to go to the next step to release and escape. Primarily, especially with women, it’s to get out of there. It’s not trying to beat the guy. It’s to try to immobilize him temporarily, distract him temporarily, and just go. Just get out of there as quickly as you can.

Jason Hartman:

Yeah, absolutely. Well, anything you’d like to say in closing, just to kind of wrap this up, and we’ll give your website one more time, too.

Mike Pace:

Well, we do have a general DVD that can be used for men or women, and we usually sell it in a set, and that’s our Street Self-Defense 101 series. Someone can reach that by going to www.learn-self-defense.com. We also have a Women’s Self-Defense DVD, which is specifically for women. That one is www.womens-self-defense.com. And also, I’ll give you one more website, if I can, Jason, and this is a general website that has all of our DVDs on it, training manuals, but it also has a lot of articles and so on for self-defense, and they can also register for our free newsletter there. That one is www.self-defense-videos.com. They can go on that website and we have all of our products. We have a lot of articles, a lot of good resources for self-defense.

Jason Hartman:

Excellent. Well, Mike Pace, thanks so much for joining us on the show today, and everybody listening, this is a very important topic, and get familiar with it before you ever need it because inevitably there will be a situation that will rise at some point in life and you need to know this good information. Mike, thank you very much.

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Duration: 35 minutes

 

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