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HS 244 – The American Dream with Tad Lumpkin

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Tad Lumpkin is the creator of The American Dream film and is a second time guest on the show. Tad does a quick review of what his film is about and then both Jason and Tad jump right into everything that’s wrong in the United States including the central banking system, the federal reserve, national debt, and more. Tad’s latest project is called Shock & Awe, which are 10 minute animated/live action shorts educating the public in a fun and satirical way.

 

Key Takeaways:
2:20 – Tad breaks down what the American Dream film is about.
7:05 – The problem isn’t the people in the central bank or federal reserve, the problem is the system.
10:35 – We are using our military to maintain our debt and keep kicking the can down the road.
13:10 – Despite the British being as imperialistic as they were, they still made a huge contribution to the world.
18:45 – Tad believes there’s going to be a massive deflation.
23:20 – Which country can you compare the US to? Europe and China are both a mess.
25:10 – Jason and Tad talk about how bad China’s economy is.
30:00 – We’ve got more technology than ever before to create a better life for everyone.
32:45 – The middle class showcases the health of the economy and it is shrinking in the US.
36:35 – When there was a depression in 1921, Harding and Coolidge took responsibility and cut government. There was an economic crash, but then it went right back up.
38:00 – Tad creates 10 minute shorts titled ‘Shock & Awe’ that tackle education, marriage, and more.

 

Tweetables:
I don’t think there’s anything else that’s quite like it, so people still find the American Dream extremely relevant.

How much poorer should we make the population today just so we can maintain power?

 

Mentioned In This Episode:
https://thebulletwire.com

 

Transcript

Jason Hartman:
It’s my pleasure to welcome Tad Lumpkin back to the show. He was on a few years ago talking about the American Dream film. He’s been working on some other great projects entitled Shock & Awe and it’s a pleasure to have him back. Tad, welcome, how are you?

Tad Lumpkin:
Oh thanks for having me, Jason. I’m great.

Jason:
Well, the pleasure is all mine. So, first, let’s just review here and let’s talk about the American Dream film. This is a phenomenal way that you’ve distilled some really big ideas into just 30 minutes. You talked about how we’re being scammed by some of these most basic elements of our governmental system. The banking system, of course, Wall Street, the manipulation of markets and prices in all of these different things. Let’s dive in and just give us a review on the American Dream film. I think that’s really seminal work that you’ve done.

Tad:
Well, thanks. You know, that film still gets..It’s amazing how many emails I get even four years after we’ve put that out. All the time there’s still just tremendous interest in it, because I don’t think there’s anything else that’s quite like it, so people still find it extremely relevant. You know, the American Dream film was meant to really take the structural and philosophical brokenness of our modern day banking and monetary system and boil it down into something that would be really relate-able, understandable, and easy to watch for most people, because when you get into monetary policy and economics and things like that.

There are very long, they’re very dry explanations. You could spend..classes and years and masters degrees and things are studied on these things. What we really wanted to try and do was distill all of that complexity, which is usually used to confuse people and keep them from asking questions, and distill it down to a really, you know, kind of story based explanation of how this stuff works and why inherently will fail and screw you in the process.

Jason:
Okay, explain if you would how it works and how it’ll fail and how it’ll screw you in the process it, if you would, just give our listeners the readers digest of that whole system.

Tad:
Yeah, absolutely. So, basically, central banking has taken over as a monopoly system in the entire world.

Jason:
It’s the biggest scam in the world.

Tad:
So, you give these handful of central banks, right, the federal reserve, the EU has one, there’s the Japanese central bank. There’s a handful of central banks, which all by the way work in collusion with one another and also, they work primarily by you take a central bank and you put it well chartered by government institutions operate outside of direct government oversight and what you do basically is you form around those a cartel system with the largest global banks being the most significant, really only relevant cartel members.

The federal reserve and the central banks like it have the exclusive power to print money, so they can print money and spend that money and set the pricing of interest rates, which is one of the most key determiners of economy and price and when there’s correct in evaluations and how capital is allocated, they basically have a secret and highly, you know, conflicted of interest monopoly power over setting interest rates and printing money. There’s nothing that stops them except what 9 guys who think they’re smarter than everybody because they went to Princeton or Yale, decide what should be done and what shouldn’t be done and that, by the way, is done in deep conjunction with people who run the banking system and have direct benefit of profit and expansion of their own business as a result of that monetary policy is going to be.

So, the reason that’s so dangerous is because it’s the same reason why when you look at why Russia or some place like communist Russia failed is because you put a bunch of bureaucrats in there who are human beings and have all sorts of corrupt interests as well as fiduciary, you know, conflict and you sit them in there and they say, hey, what’s the price of a screw or a gallon a gas or whatever else?

Jason:
And, how much poorer should we make the population today just so we can maintain power and spend money the way we wish?

Tad:
That’s exactly right and you look at it even in the politicians, you know, if I can go in and print more money, which lowers interest rates and stokes home buying and puts all this cash into the banking system so that banks will offer no deposit loans for houses, 50 year mortgages, teaser trick rates, and I can juice up the home owner rate. Well, all of a sudden, I run in a say look, I got everybody into homes, vote me back in for more power, I’m a winner, I’m a winner, and then all of a sudden like we know in the business cycle that’s going to eventually crash and all those people who got to live in homes they couldn’t afford for 2-3 years are going to end up worse off and then the rest of us are going to be on the hook to bail that system out and suffer economic recession and all sorts of other stuff as a result.

Jason:
I would say the guy who was called such a hero, Alan Greenspan, the maestro as they called him. If you look for a single individual to blame the financial crisis on, it would be Alan Greenspan. He retired at just the right time, so that he could turn over all the problems to Bernanke. Now, I wonder if Bernanke did the same thing to Janet Yellen. We will see.

Tad:
Oh yeah, he most definitely did and Janet Yellen is going to do the same thing. I mean, the problem isn’t the people. The problem is it’s an unobtainable situation. It’s the same reason why communism can never, has never, and will never work. It’s because central planning doesn’t work. It never has, it never will.

The only thing that creates not only justice, but economic prosperity in a broad and an amazing way like we talk about, you know, the ideas of the American dream is when you have open market capitalism with lots of competitive actors and people get to choose in and buy in to the best available product that fits for them. Be that for currency, banking, or anything else. That is the only way that you do it.

Otherwise it just becomes this corrupt disasters. You know, that’s what we got and that’s why people sit there and go, hey, what’s happening to, you know, this huge swath of middle class people and what’s happening..why are these richer people just getting richer and richer and stock prices go up yet the broader economy doesn’t heal and, you know, that’s your answer and until people are willing to, you know, deal with that historical fact, then, you know, it’s not going to systemically get any better. They’re just going to up the dose of opium of financial opium to try and double down to eventually it always ends up in currency collapse. It always does.

Jason:
It does, but see here’s the difference and I know, I get it. Historically it always ends in currency collapse. The most dangerous words you’ll ever here are this time it’s different, but I’m going to say them, this time is different. I’m not defending this whole thing, because I think it’s an epic scam and that’s why I’ve had you on the show twice now, but the reason it is different and it’s not fair to the rest of the world, but it’s different for the US and I’d like you to pick these apart and challenged me on this. Please do, I want to be challenged on it. I wanna see if my thinking is wrong here. So, here’s my thinking. The US has the largest military the human race has ever known. It has the reserve currency of the world. It has the biggest brand in the world. It has very unique geography that protect it from military threats and it has abundant national resources.

So, this country is oddly, as mismanaged as it is, in some ways it’s an incredibly rich country even now. Even with 17 trillion dollar debt and 60 to 220 trillion unfunded entitlements or mandates over the next couple of decades. Why I mention the military and the big brand and the geography and all the other things is because in order to maintain this nonsensical undeserved reserve currency status, we will probably and have probably, it’s very arguable we have already, use that military to kick the can down the road to maintain this irresponsible set of policy that we maintain so our politicians can just spend, spend, spend without any real accountability and kick the can down the road, if you will. So, maybe, we can kick this can down the road and keep that reserve currency, which is a big huge, huge part of it and we can discuss why that’s so important for the next 5-10 decades. I don’t know.

Tad:
Well, I mean, it takes a long time. The timing of how these things unravel and why they do and what it looks like is definitely, you know, up for debate. Sometimes it lasts a lot longer than you think it can. Generally when it ends it ends very quickly and very poorly, but I think a couple of there I would comment on is that, first off, I don’t know of any empire in the world that has had its economic engine diminished and has been able to maintain a significant military presence as a thing that equalizes and keeps them on the powerful global footing without their people and eventually their entire country coming to a massive reduced standard of living and eventually collapse upon itself anyway because of that reduced standard of living and that reduced economic output in the things you have to do to force people to go along with it, will eventually collapse the military.

I mean, you know, you could go back and you can look at Rome, you can look at the USSR, you can look at, you know, even like North Korea can’t feed its people while their military is no match for ours, the idea that they shifted the resources predominately into their military as most communist countries have done over time, it still eventually collapses on itself. The English, I mean, the British empire had the same, you know, placement in the world as the United States did and in they had this vast military. The most superior naval fleet and the ability to reach the globe in the world. Just at the turn of the century and they got out of whack and they got absolutely hammered. You know, they aren’t the global power they were supplanted.

Jason:
I hear you about Rome and England. I mean, the sun never set on the British empire, right? No question the British as imperialistic that they were and they can argue with me with this, made a huge contribution to the world. I’m going to say that because, man, those Brits, they were organized. You look at how everybody revelers Gandhi as a hero, and in some ways he is, this is kind of on a tangent, but I just wanted to throw it out there to be controversial. In many ways Gandhi was certainly a hero, peaceful, passive, resistance, etc.

That’s all great, but he was a really primitive guy, okay. He believed in abstinence for birth control, which is part of..that never works. Okay, look at the problems India faces with over population today. If the Brits were not in India, they wouldn’t speak English and I think they advanced that country as imperialistic and as terrible as imperialism is, it does have a few benefits. So, I know that is a very controversial view point, I get it, and to some extent I’m throwing it out there to be intentionally controversial.

Tad:
I think the best type of imperialism though is actually economic trade. Rather than, you know, if we take the Middle East right now and compare it to China, the best thing we’ve done is we haven’t had to fire a single shot wit h the China in any recent history and have had really as far as a rival empire very little confrontation compare to, let’s say, Russia. If you look at what’s opened them up the most, created the most prosperity and the most relations in really 50 years, 40 years, I mean, very short period of time, is economic interaction and I think that goes a lot farther and a lot quicker period of time and, frankly, that would be my biggest cure for the Middle East as oppose to economic sanctions and all that.

Jason:
Oh, no, listen, I agree. That’s obviously..

Tad:
Trade and things like that, but just to address your point this time different..

Jason:
Let me just make one more final thing on that point, because I didn’t really make. I got sort of off on a tangent there a bit with India and so forth, but my point being that with modern technology the military is so much more scalable than it was in the days of Britain in their empire. It’s just not the same thing. I mean, I don’t know how to measure this, but I would venture to say that the US military machine today. I know, I don’t agree with this military machine, I’m just saying it’s there. I’m stating the facts. I’m not in agreement with what we do, but the fact is it’s the way it is. It’s so, it’s just light years ahead of prior militaries because of drone technology, every type of technology. It’s mind boggling, it really is.

Tad:
So, let me ask you think question then, would you say that then the US military is a far, far advanced as almost as big schism in technology and man-power to the Afghanie and Taliban military?

Jason:
Like as a comparison?

Tad:
As it exists.

Jason:
You mean, so you gonna go to guerrilla warfare and how..

Tad:
Yeah.

Jason:
Yeah, yeah, no I mean..

Tad:
Here’s all I’m going to, right, is that when you make that statement, I say yes, could America go in nuclear obliterate the entire world? Sure, they can.

Jason:
Sure, but there’s a lot of conventional technology. You know, like drones.

Tad:
Let me ask you a question, why, if that’s the case, in 10+ years in Vietnam with vastly superior technology couldn’t control the country? 10+ years in Afghanistan, can’t control the country. Iraq, can’t control the country. It’s not do-able! That’s what I’m saying. You can’t do it. No one has been able to get human beings into that type..no matter how much military power they have, they’ve been able to eviscerate people from the planet, but they’re not able to control societies. It’ll never, ever work. No matter how advance the military…

Jason:
So, your point is well taken and I would say that’s a good thing. You know? Yeah.

Tad:
I think it’s a great thing, but I just think relying on the US military, because I’ve heard people make that comment to me before and I’m like, there is no point even in current history in the most lopsided fight where you’ve got literally goat-herded militia guys who are living the same way people lived 2,000 years ago, okay, with no discernible GDP fighting the country that has the largest GDP and the most sophisticated military apparatus the world has ever seen and we can’t beat them.

Jason:
But, the question then becomes is that an issue is keeping the reserve currency? I mean, look, Afghanistan is not really any real challenge to the US in reserve currency. I mean, certainly, we are exporting the inflation around the world as the US and the US citizens benefits from these economic policies that on paper, when you look at the math, they’re terrible, but it’s not just about math. That’s what I always say. It’s about much, much more than math. It’s about all those other factors that I mentioned and that’s why I don’t think we’re headed for a dollar collapse any time soon. I used to believe that.

Tad:
I actually don’t know we’re headed for a dollar collapse in that hyper inflation is the biggest problem. I actually think the world’s biggest problem in the upcoming is a massive deflation.

Jason:
Why do you think that, because that’s kind of interesting. I’ve been a promoter of the idea that we’re going to have some pretty severe inflation and till about a year ago I was kind of right, because the inflation rates are about triple what the official stats will tell you, but it really, right now, I’m kind of agreeing with you the few deflationists that are out there and there’s not many of them by the way. I’ve had Harry Dent many times and he’s saying gold is going to go to 750 and then it’s going to go to 250. Wow. That’s a pretty bold prediction.

Tad:
It could, but if that happens, if gold goes to 250, your house that was $300,000 is also going to be at $100,000 or $80,000 and Dow Jones is going to be at 2,000.

Jason:
Everything will. The reason I still like being a real estate investor. I like it much more in an inflationary environment, because I get what’s called inflation-induced debt destruction. Income property is my favorite investment, okay, but in a deflationary environment it’s just a constant search for yield. You can’t get yield anywhere. A real estate investor gets yield from cash flow and so I think you win in a deflationary environment in a smaller way, but you win huge in an inflationary environment. So, as much as I hate this irresponsible spending philosophically, I kind of like it just for my own selfish standpoint.

Tad:
Yeah. The only thing I’d say to that is if your financing costs are $300,000, but your rental costs are paid now on a $100,000, because the environment has become so deflationary, servicing your debt is going to be a big problem.

Jason:
Right, but the elicit option you always have is you can just walk away and that’s what everybody did. That’s always your backdoor option, but those rents don’t deflate that quickly, because it’s such an imperfect market. That’s kind of a long subject. I want to get to why you think we’ll have deflation and if so, how much?

Tad:
Well, I think we’re going to have deflation because money printing alone and the options that they have had available are not..while it’s putting a lot of base money into the system, the inflation, it’s not first-off getting enough velocity, meaning the broad economy, there isn’t enough real expansion to get that money moving through enough people and enough areas of the economy to, you know, basically magnify that base. So monetary works like the fed pumps in the base and then you use fractional reserve lending to take the money that’s put in and magnify that as we explained in the America Dream, many, many fold up. The spend of that is the velocity.

You need the fed to print money, the banks to loan it, and that money to cycle through the economy at a high rate to really get broad inflation. What you’ve seen happen is, the feds put in money, but the inflation has been highly targeted. So, where you’ve seen real inflation are areas the government can complete the demand loop. IE, education has gone way up, health care has gone way up, and you’re also seeing the rich people, the uber, uber rich in the global areas where you talk about exporting the inflation and the small slither of people that have benefited as a result are coming in and buying baseball teams and basket ball teams.

I mean, do you not read every week basically that these global destinations cities be it, like, London, New York, LA, San Francisco, Hong Kong, they hit a new record price on the most expensive condo ever bought. 150-200 million. That’s where the inflation going. The problem is that’s not going to work to prop up the whole thing and what you’re seeing collapse along with oil prices collapsing, you’re seeing demand is tumbling. I mean, Europe I think is the place it’s going to start.

Jason:
Oh, Europe…I’ll tell you another thing I should have actually brought up with you a few minutes ago. This is a great, great discussion by the way. So, thank you for that, but you know, another issue is the issue of relativity. Okay, the theory of relativity. It’s the issue of comparison. It’s like, yeah, America is doing all kinds of bad, stupid, wrong things, but how bad..compared to what is the question? You know, Europe is a disaster and a half. China is a disaster. You know, some people still don’t really realize that, but just wait 5-10 years. China is a mess. I mean, who is better off than the US?

Tad:
Well, I think the thing is is it’s kind of like worst kid on the block, but here’s what really concerns me the most, okay. What you’re seeing is and, looking at geopolitical things is that you’re seeing the raise in nationalism occur in Europe right now. I mean, you’re seeing a huge..When you look at what’s happening Hungary with Jobbik and there are an ultra-nationalistic group. In France, all over Europe. I mean, the EU, I think, is done. I don’t think they’ll be able to keep it together.

Jason:
That was a failed experiment from the beginning. It’s just too crazy of an idea.

Tad:
But, when you take nationalism and you fuse it with economic depression and hopelessness.

Jason:
And you have countries that are so close together.

Tad:
Yeah, you tend to get bad results. When the Chinese realized they’ve basically a whole generation of saving is located in bonds that may not be worth anything and cities that no one has ever lived in. I mean, you mentioned China. There’s literally to keep demand up, the government has just commissioned building cities that no one lives in and people own, their investment properties, are apartments that are prompt up by money printing and government misallocation of capital.

When that eventually comes to roost. It’s like hey, you know the money that grandma saved up for 30 years and bought this condo in a city no one lives in and it’s not worth $400,000, it’s actually worth like $4,000. You’re going to see trillions of trillions of dollars wiped out and reshuffled around the world and what are people going to do when their lifestyle, you know, what happens when the social security check doesn’t show up or it doesn’t buy what it used to. I mean, everybody is not..There’s going to be a consequence. Someone has to be pay. It’s either going to be the people who produce have to give more of their production away.

Jason:
And that’s what they’re already doing! Look at China. That’s exactly what they’re doing. It’s a great deal for the US what’s going on. I mean, everybody looks a the trade deficit, I’m like, are you kidding? What are you totally myopic? The Us is totally getting the benefit of the trade deficit. It’s like the old saying, let them sweat while we print money and we just devalue what they keep paying them and we keep having to produce more for what, I mean, wow. What a terrible deal for China and what a great deal that is for the United States.

Tad:
I just wonder..I just don’t think and I can’t point to any time in history in where that deal, which has existed before, has ever not eventually come apart. I don’t know that basically the brick countries and in particular China are going to continue at a by the way increasing rate, to continue to ship us their wealth while we ship them our inflation. I mean, does that go on in perpetude, like you said, it could go on 10 more years, 20 years.

Jason:
Oh, I think it could go on 50 more years, but it is wrong and I don’t think they should be doing it, but the question is it’s the Wall Street concept you keep hearing and Wall Street is an epic scam it’s the modern version of organized crime right after central banking, but you know, it’s TINA, it’s that acronym TINA. There Is No Alternative. What else are they going to do? Where else are they going to sell their wears? I mean, they haven’t created their own economy where they’ve got enough customer base internally. I mean, what are they going to do? Export to Africa? C’mon, US is the only customer. The only big, huge customer.

Tad:
You know what, I’ll tell you what, I heard this exact same argument in the 80s when people talked about Japan and you know what? It’s like the Nikkei is still at what a 3rd of what it was 30 years ago? I’m just saying that until someone proves to me is 1+1 no longer equals 2. I’m betting on history. I’m betting on the fact while gold is an imperfect, there is no perfect currency backer, until someone invents one that lasts or has value for 6,000 years, which I don’t know much that it ever has except for that, then I’m just saying like! You know?

I trust gold a hell a lot more than I trust 9 eggheads in a room who think they’re going to control the world and tell me what interest rates should be better than open markets can. I think that, I don’t know how it’ll all come down for sure, but I will say that when people’s expectations have the reckoning with reality and somebody is going to have, because the math don’t add up, whether it starts in Europe and whether it goes to China and whether they want to carry the US a number of rounds. I don’t really know, but somebody somewhere in large scale is going to have to live a hell a lot of poorer with a hell of a lot less savings than they thought they should have and are going to have and I don’t know! You know, I add that up and that generally equals large wars. I don’t know that everybody’s just going like, it’s going to sit by and it’s all gonna go well.

I mean, I frankly think a global globalism, you know, replaced empire-ism of the colonialism of the 20th-19th century was replaced by globalism of the 20th century. I don’t think either of them work for many of the same reasons. They look a little bit different. You get to vote in one of them, that’s cool, but I mean, I’m just saying…

Jason:
But, is your vote even meaningful anyway?

Tad:
Of course not! It’s just a show. I mean, it’s like, you know, it’s all pomp and circumstance. It’s going to come home to roost. I do think this, though, which is what’s really cool. I do think we’ve got more technologies and more ways to create human prosperity and connectivity than we ever had in human history.

Jason:
I think so too and that’s the amazing thing, you know.

Tad:
I think that means we can go through the bad period, wash it out, reset with the least amount of damage as it has ever been possible in human history. I just still think people are going to have to deal with the realities of the mathematics and at some point, you know, Germany can’t just throw enough money at Greece and Spain and Italy to keep them alive at a 40% unemployment rate where you’ve basically got 18-29 year old men with nothing to do and no families and no investment in the economy. I’m just saying, man, when you put 18 year old men with nothing to do, it doesn’t end well!

Jason:
That’s a huge problem for them. I couldn’t agree with you more.

Tad:
I think we have some of the problem here which is..

Jason:
Yeah, we do, we do, but it’s much worse in Europe. I mean, I was in Spain last year. Spain is a disaster.

Tad:
It’s all a disaster, but I’m saying that they’re trying to keep the lid on that and that could be the situation in a lot more places very quickly if this facade of a recovery is popped. I mean, you already see huge amounts of problems. You know, America, while in better shape than Europe, as you say, not in great shape. Not a lot of millennials, young people, marriage rates, family rates, things that normally prompt stability and growth of society as well as sort of the moral fabric that keeps people, you know, looking a little higher than a little lower, not at a great place.

You know, you see the hotbed that’s built up. Things like Ferguson and places like that, I mean, I was talking about somebody the other day, you know, regardless of whatever you think about what the verdict of this or that should or shouldn’t be, I said, you know, I’ll tell you this much, if unemployment was 4% and the black community and inner cities weren’t so destitute in their economic and educational hope. I guarantee stuff wouldn’t get burned at anywhere near the rate. It’s just a function of ongoing hopelessness and frustration that’s going on. It’s about way more than the interaction of all the hash tags and whatever that, you know, twittered out on these events. It’s about an ongoing disassociation with the…

Jason:
What we have is we have certainly a symptom of all of the stuff we’re talking about whether it be central banking, you know, the massive concentration of wealth among the uber, uber rich, and how Wall Street and the legal system are just stealing the money from the population they can steal it from and that’s the middle class and the middle class is shrinking and that is not a recipe for stability and that is not a good thing by any standard and it just makes us look more like a lot of these banana republic countries out there.

I just don’t understand why people would wanna go on a, oh, let’s go live in Costa Rica where you have no roads, no infrastructure, everybody I deal with in Costa Rica, and I’m not picking on Costa Rica, it’s a beautiful place, I’ve been there, but you know, any of these central or south American countries basically or other countries around the world, you know, the power goes out frequently. You gotta have razor barbed wire around your house and bars on the windows. I mean, who wants to live like that? That’s no fun.

So, I agree, with the middle class is a probably the best metric of health of society and it is shrinking in America, but at the same time, I say we’ve got all of this great technology. People like Steven Kotler I had on the show the co-author with Peter Diamandis of the book Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think. They profile a lot of this technology. Michael Milken and Jeremy Siegel few years back wrote an article about the looming asset shortage. I mean, I don’t know, I don’t know what to believe. In the Abundance book they talk about the raising billion, it’s really the raising 3-5 billion. We will see which way this goes. It’s an amazing time to be alive. There are certain a lot of threats that we underlined, but there are signs of hope, too. I’d love to have you back on Tad as we watch this unfold and see which way it all goes, you know?

Tad:
Absolutely. I’ll tell ya, I’m bullish, I’m very bullish on long term humanity.

Jason:
You could have fooled me, okay. I’m just teasing ya.

Tad:
I’m bullish because human beings had survived through way, way worse times in human history than we have now. I mean, where we’ve got all sorts of sciences and technology and transportation and infrastructure and energy sources that have never existed. It’s not like, okay, human beings are not on an upward tilt over the long haul, it’s just the things I really worry about is I don’t want to see, you know, a 100 million people dying in a war or a billion people live horrible poverty for 25 years longer than they need to where generations don’t have hope. I don’t want to lose those things on the whim.

You look at these things and say, you know, for us, who didn’t actually live or fight or any of that World War two. I mean, if you just go back, what’s a 100 million dead people look like? You know what I mean? It’s horrible. Now, we’re like watching Saving Private Ryan and it’s like oh okay, great, that was a great generation and now we’ve moved on, but it’s like, when we’re all losing brothers and sisters when we all have parents who can’t take care of themselves because banks were liquidated their entire life savings vanished. When we have, real, like, rubber meets the road where huge amounts of displacement and pain go on for sustain periods of time, it’s just not good. It doesn’t mean we’re not going to rebound as a people and a planet and a country and whatever.

I just sit there and I’m like, that’s a hell of a lot human pain, man. I don’t want to see that happen in the way..I don’t want the reset to be any more devastating than it needs to be. I sit there and I look at, you know, there’s a depression no one ever really talks about that took place right after Woodrow Wilson in 1921 and it took about 15 months to cycle through the depression, because luckily Harding and Coolidge were pretty free market guys. They cut government, they did the much more Libertarian orientated free market approach. It went down sharply, a bunch of people went bankrupt, boom, right back up.

Jason:
We don’t do that anymore.

Tad:
As oppose to..

Jason:
We just kick the can down the road.

Tad:
That’s right. So, you get a 10-15 year depressions where you ruin families and whole generations of..

Jason:
And you bail out the two big too fails and that’s what so unfair about the whole thing. Tad, I gotta wrap up though. I would love to talk to you for another hour about this stuff it’s fascinating. Give out your website, tell people where they can find ya.

Tad:
Yeah, so if you go to TheBulletWire.com. We have obviously the American Dream film up there. I post a lot of articles and things I find to be important as well as we have a new series called Shock and Awe shorts, which are about 10 minute mixed animation/live action films, which we tackle education, the marriage debate, guns and the roots of violence. Lots of these things. Still using satirical fun humor and story telling to kind of break down these kind of complicated and very potent debates into simple to understand packages. So, sign up on our Facebook, follow us on Twitter, but go to TheBulletWire.com. We post all our media there.

Jason:
Fantastic. Tad Lumpkin. You are a fascinating guy and you do some great work. Keep it up and thanks for joining us again today.

Tad;
Excellent. Thanks Jason, I appreciate it.

Episode: 244

Guest: Tad Lumpkin

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